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Workplace Burnout: How To Spot It For Your Enneagram Type

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Workplace Burnout: How To Spot It For Your Enneagram Type

We all have someone that comes to mind when we think of the most goal-oriented, athletic person we know. Similarly, someone different comes to mind when we think of the timid individual who keeps to themselves but is kind to everyone. Perhaps you identify with either of these? But, to this point, our unique personalities, archetypical or otherwise, are more susceptible to different sources of burnout. Today, we want to take you through the things you can look for in your enneagram type and perhaps avoid burnout altogether.

What Is Burnout?

But before we dive in, we first need to establish the baseline. What is burnout anyway? In our studies, we have discovered that burnout is a type of stress. Though there is good stress (eustress), burnout is one that compounds over time. 

Like a snowball that starts packed in between your hands. It only takes setting it on the snowy ground and releasing it down a hill for it to catch more snow and grow. It is physically and emotionally draining and pours into your work and home life. It makes us feel like giving up, question why we do what we do in the first place and often leaves us unmotivated. 

The fact is, though, that if you catch it, you can work towards freeing yourself from burnout and even re-spark the passion you had for the very thing that is causing it. But, first, you must become self-aware.

The Enneagram One 

Ones seek perfection. Seeking to improve not only yourself but everyone and thing around you is exhausting. Catching that perfectionism when it starts and introducing acceptance into your self-care practice can be pivotal in avoiding workplace burnout. You don’t want to be judged by anyone, but what if you are? What if you accept that all of us, every human, is judged? You can make extraordinary changes in our world, but first, you must remember to care for your basic needs. 

The Enneagram Two

The Helper. You are dubbed that nickname for a reason, Twos. Trying to meet everyone’s needs around you, and, in cases, trying to be like the people you look up to leaves little room for self. Your warm-heartedness and sincerity are appreciated, but sometimes you freely give those to the cost of your health. 

A natural helper, we understand your need to give. But you cannot give what you don’t have. Start to notice where you can care for yourself more and lean into helping you. Ignoring your needs will inevitably lead to burnout.

The Enneagram Three

If you related to the first example in this post, when the words goal-oriented flashed on the screen, you might be the Enneagram Three. Many people want to be this type, but it does not come without worry. Threes feel responsible. 

There’s no doubt the mantra, “Get Sh*t Done,” came from one. This attitude makes you prone to overworking. Trying to make it look like you have it all together all of the time while work and priorities pile up around you is exhausting. Step back, assess your priorities, and give yourself grace when you realize that you genuinely cannot do it all. It will free you.

The Enneagram Four

One of the most sensitive types, Fours, need support. With their natural propensity to withdraw from people, this can be hard to get. If you are a Four, you must ask for support. 

You also want to express yourself, show your individuality, and bathe in self-expression. To do so, can you find a creative outlet to pursue? This could be key in unlocking your calm and avoiding work burnout.

The Enneagram Five

An Investigator by nature, Fives want info. Emotional detachment keeps involvement in others at bay, leaving room for deep-dives into complex ideas. They want to be experts and fear intrusion from others will thwart it. So, fives can hold critical information from those who need it to help carry the workload. 

Tending to your physical wellbeing and leaning into the friendships and relationships around you can help stave off burnout. Giving information to others is rewarding, and it helps everyone. 

The Enneagram Six

Reliable and loyal. Loyal to belief. Loyal to ideas. Loyal to systems. If you have learned about Wholeness At Work, you know that burnout can exist within a system. So, Sixes have a unique hill to climb. 

They strive to avoid failure and lack self-confidence, which can, in itself, lead to burnout. But, not being willing to question a system in place which may be causing burnout amongst the team could lead them even further down the path. Keep your loyalty, but know when to step out of the box and identify when change is beneficial.

The Enneagram Seven

For Sevens, new ideas fuel them. But, in planning to keep their options open for the next best thing, Sevens can quickly become scatter-brained. 

If you are an enneagram seven, how can you connect with the here and now? Find a way to connect to now so that tomorrow can lead to you reaching your biggest goals. 

The Enneagram Eight

Type Eights are strong and confident, but this can lead you to hide your vulnerabilities. The truth is, vulnerability is a strength. You may feel the need to reject people or possible failures before they reject you—but that can lead to a quick depletion. 

Can you find a way to become open to criticism, the leadership of others, and vulnerability? How can you get there?

The Enneagram Nine

You seek peace, harmony, and dislike ill will. Similar to Enneagram Two, you quickly place the needs of the group above your own. 

To avoid burnout, an Eight needs to prioritize self-care. Sometimes it is necessary to remind yourself that the more care you give to you will create room to care for others. How can you relax into self-care today?


If you feel like you are moving full speed ahead on the path to burnout, please join us on the Wholeness at Work journey. We dive into the symptoms, sources, and solutions to workplace burnout so that we can move forward whole in the workplace and our daily lives.

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